Bill Lise

Japanese-to-English Translation

Content thought to be of particular value to beginners is marked (←what's this?), although some of such marked content might be of use or interest to people who have worked for a while in translation.

Content marked by ↗↗ is located on my company website and will open in a separate tab.

Articles

The Factors Affecting the Rates You Can Take for Japanese-to-English Translation (June 24, 2022)
There is no market, fair, or going rate for translation. It's more complex.
The Importance of Context in Japanese-to-English Translation (May 29, 2022)
Often-ignored inherited wisdom.
One Japanese-to-English Translator's Journey into the World of Translation ↗↗ (April 29, 2022)
Becoming a translator and interpreter is not as formulaic a process as some might think.
Japanese Competency for the NES Japanese-to-English Translator (Edited April 5, 2022)
Just how good is good enough and how good might you want to strive to be in reading/using Japanese?

Reports

"An Investigation of Terminology and Syntax in Japanese and US Patents and the Implications for the Patent Translator" ↗↗ (December 26, 2018)
A recently edited version of the 2011 version of a paper presented at the IJET-5 Conference in Urayasu (Chiba), 1994.

Presentations & Publications

Getting from Tier Two to Tier One in Japanese to English Translation ↗↗
My 2019 presentation at the last IJET Conference to be held before the Covid pandemic. It might not offer advice to that many colleagues, but the content has certainly not gone stale.
Chapter 5 of the ATA Japanese Patent Translation Handbook ↗↗ (Last revised April 6, 2021)
ATA Japanese Patent Translation HandbookA greatly revised version of this content describing Japanese-to-English patent translation for US filing, fixing some content of the original version which has gone stale in the years since the original was published.
"JA-EN Patent Translation" ↗↗ (April 12-13, 2008, Nineteenth International Japanese/English Translation Conference (IJET-19) Proceedings, Okinawa, Japan)
The original version, which might include broken links and email addresses; a somewhat modified version is currently planned.
"Symbols, Abbreviations, and Layout Issues in JA-EN Translation" ↗↗ (19-21 June, IJET 97 (IJET-8) Proceedings, Sheffield, UK)
The original version, which might include broken links and email addresses; a somewhat modified version is currently planned.
"Japanese-English Translation of Patent Documents for Filing in the US" ↗↗ (May 18-19, 1996, Seventh International Japanese/English Translation Conference (IJET-7) Proceedings, Yokohama, Japan)
The original version (slides only), which might include broken links and email addresses; a somewhat modified version is currently planned.

Wakaba (若葉) Mark ()

This is a mark that new drivers in Japan are required to put on their vehicles when they first start driving. There was also a mark they at one point elderly drivers were to affix to their cars. It is informally called the 枯れ葉 (wilted leaf) mark (), or—perhaps even more controversially—the 落ち葉 (fallen leaf) mark. The official and more politically correct name of the mark is 高齢運転者標識.

The government had initially made the application of this mark to a vehicle optional and voluntary and then made it mandatory. Oppostiion to that change caused the government to back down, and the mark is now optional and voluntary again. A newer design of the elderly driver mark is different from the one shown above and includes four leaves; light green, deeper green, yellow, and orange. Perhaps this change was also the result of opposition to the original design.